Category Archives: Articles

What is it Like to Homeschool? You Have No Idea

So the boy is going to be heading off to college in less than eight weeks. Yes, a college actually accepted him and even gave him money. Who would have thought?

What was I even thinking when we decided to homeschool eleven years ago? Did I know what I was getting into? I thought I did. I can be an obsessive researcher and believe in being prepared whenever possible. Just ask my family about my travel notebooks of maps, hotels reservations, and itineraries. Continue reading »

Writing Instruction: Current Practices in the Classroom

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Over the past forty years, the emphasis in writing instruction has shifted from product to process. A companion ERIC Digest entitled “Writing Instruction: Changing Views over the Years” gives an overview of this development during the period from 1960 to 1999. The present digest focuses on the experiences of individual teachers as they searched for ways to put the principles of process writing into practice in the classroom. Continue reading »

Why, How, and When Should My Child Learn a Second Language

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

Much media attention has recently been focused on the importance of early learning experiences on brain development. Newsweek devoted a special edition to the critical first 3 years of a child’s life and indicated that there is a “window of opportunity” for second language learning starting at 1 year of age. A February 1997 article in Time magazine suggested that foreign languages should be taught to children as early as possible. With so many demands already placed on children, parents might ask: Is it important that my child learns a second language at a young age? Why? What options are available? Continue reading »

Why I Homeschool–Thursday Nights

What do Thursday nights have to do with homeschooling? Everything.

My son was in first grade and wanted to play baseball.  My husband and I both worked. So I would take off early from work to pick up Ethan from daycare and get him to practice by 5:30 or 6:00. After practice, we would pick up one those healthy and homey meals from a fast food place and eat on the way home. This allowed us more time for Ethan to study for his spelling test, do any other homework, take his bath, and get to be so that we could all get up at six the next morning and do it again. Continue reading »

When Children Might be Better Left Behind

I had a very good friend who decided to start homeschooling in the middle of her chemotherapy treatment. She had been very active in the PTA and was actually president for the second time when her son began having problems in the fourth grade. She had been considering the idea of homeschooling for a while but the final straw came just before Thanksgiving. Continue reading »

What do Homeschoolers REALLY do all day?

kids acting like a superhero retro vintage instagram filter

I know, it sounds like the headline for some celebrity gossip magazine. What superstars do in private isn’t the same thing that they project to the world and we all want to know.

Well, this is actually a pretty similar situation except what homeschoolers really do isn’t the same thing that non-homeschoolers or even new homeschoolers believe is happening or should be happening. Continue reading »

Homeschooling Methods: Waldorf

library 200Waldorf is an education system developed in 1919 by Rudolf Steiner in Europe. The basic premise of a Waldorf education is the rejection of materialism and embracing the spiritual aspects of humanity. The Waldorf method addresses the three aspects of humanity as defined by Steiner, physical, emotional, and thinking often referred to as the hands, heart, and head. Steiner believed that the education system spent too much time on the “thinking” at the expense of the “physical” and “emotional.” Continue reading »

Using Primary Sources in the Primary Grades

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

What do a stamped Christmas postcard dated 1910, a Confederate one hundred dollar bill, soda pop bottles from Egypt, ice tongs, a rug beater, and a woven prayer rug from the Middle East with a picture of the Kaaba at Mecca all have in common? These and many other artifacts can become primary sources, the very real “stuff” of the social studies that can so effectively engage the young learner in active learning. The use of primary sources in the classroom is a way for students to develop the intellectual curiosity that leads to further research and increased awareness of the world around them. Continue reading »

Top Ten Reasons to Homeschool

10. Help reduce public school class size

9. You know what they’re eating for lunch

8. Lost permission slips aren’t a problem

7. Forgot books at school-so what?

6. End “what to wear” to school arguments

5. Don’t have to worry about missing the bus

4. Can’t forget projects at home

3. Parent-Teacher conferences are a breeze

2. Who knows? You might like your kids!

1. Learning is something you do, not where you go