Daily Archives: December 26, 2012

Homeschooling and Higher Education

dartmouth-college 200As a result of the recent growth of homeschooling in the US, colleges and universities have received an increasing number of application from home-schooled students. Admissions offices have found it necessary to assess whether and how their admissions requirements should be modified to allow fair review of the credentials submitted by homeschooled students. Continue reading »

Homeschoolers Misinforming Homeschoolers

Inform Mislead Signpost Meaning Advise Or Misinform

It’s bad enough that public school officials give out bad information on homeschooling requirements such as requesting to view potential homeschoolers’ curriculum. What’s worst is when a homeschool organization contributes to the misinformation. The following is the FEAST (Family Educators Alliance of South Texas) website information for new homeschoolers. Continue reading »

A Brief Overview of Homeschooling

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education. While somewhat dated, the article provides a balanced overview of homeschooling.

A small but growing number of school-aged children will not routinely spend time in a school classroom this year. Instead, these children engage in HOME SCHOOLING–that is, they will pursue learning at home or elsewhere in the community. Continue reading »

Home Schools are Private Schools in Texas–For Now

lady-justice 200Homeschoolers in Texas are incredibly fortunate because a “home school” is considered the equivalent of an unaccredited private school. And after hearing what it takes to homeschool in states such as Pennsylvania, most welcome any legislation that reinforces such a definition. But just because a bill uses the term “home school” doesn’t automatically make it a good thing. Continue reading »

Helping Your Child With Science

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

“Being “scientific” involves being curious, asking how things happen, and learning how to find the answers. Curiosity is natural to children, but they need help understanding how to make sense of what they see. All we need is a willingness to observe and learn with them, and, above all, to make an effort and take the time to nurture their natural curiosity.” Continue reading »

Handwriting Instruction: What Do We Know?

old-letters 200.2There is increased emphasis on children’s writing today, but the emphasis is on writing stories and essays that demonstrate that children are learning to think. However, before children can write anything, they must learn printing or cursive handwriting. Despite the influence of new technologies, the computer and the word processor have not replaced the need to learn how to print or write. Continue reading »

Grammar and its Teaching: Challenging the Myths

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Grammar is often misunderstood in the language teaching field. The misconception lies in the view that grammar is a collection of arbitrary rules about static structures in the language. Continue reading »

Free Field Trips for the Frugal San Antonio Homeschooler

alamo feild tripAre the best things in life free or do you get what you pay for? I think this selection of free museum days in San Antonio is probably a mix of the two. Would a visit to the missions be dramatically better if the National Park Service charged a fee for the visit? Probably not–or at least not worth the price.

Yet I think a case could be made that a visit to the Alamo would be much more informative if an admission fee was charged. If nothing else, the free days at the museums that otherwise charge an admissions fee allows you to visit and decide it you think it would be worth it return and pay the regular price. Continue reading »

Science Matters: 7 Free Energy Curriculum Resources for Homeschoolers

power-poles 200There is a lot of free stuff on the web and some of it is actually pretty good. But who wants to spend the time looking up each site to find out what is actually on it? Right. So I’ve done it for you. I admit I didn’t go through all the gajillion results but I did get through quite a few of the pages of an “energy curriculum” search. I found out all kinds of interesting stuff including curriculum plans for college degrees. But I’ll spare you and just list the finds related to energy curriculum. Continue reading »