Tag Archives: Social Studies

Teaching about Africa

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

People from African countries who visit the United States often are stunned by how little Americans know about African cultures. Africa is a large continent more than three times the size of the continental United States, and it contains over 50 independent countries. One out of every three member states in the United Nations is an African country. One out of every ten people in the world lives on the African continent. Increasingly, the United States has trading and corporate ties to African countries. Now, more than ever, our students need a basic understanding of Africa. Continue reading »

The Seneca Falls Convention: Teaching about the Rights of Women and the Heritage of the Declaration of Independence

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Different groups at different times have turned to founding documents of the United States to meet their needs and to declare their entitlement to the promises of the Revolution of 1776. At Seneca Falls, New York in the summer of 1848, a group of American men and women met to discuss the legal limitations imposed on women during this period. Continue reading »

“Remember the Ladies” Women in the Curriculum

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

In March 1776, Abigail Adams implored her husband John to “…remember the ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors….” This plea, unfortunately, did not affect the practical political behavior of John Adams and other founders of the United States. It was not until the 20th Amendment to the Constitution in 1919 that women throughout the United States gained a fundamental right of citizenship: the right to vote for representation in government. Continue reading »

Learning History through Children’s Literature

childrens-books 200The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Teaching history using children’s literature, both fiction and non-fiction, is an old idea enjoying new vitality in the elementary and middle school curriculum. This Digest discusses (1) the revival of interest in teaching history through children’s literature, (2) research-based guidelines for teachers of history and children’s literature, and (3) an innovative method of teaching history using children’s literature. Continue reading »

Ditch Your Curriculum for these 13 Competitions Instead

As a homeschooler, what do you have your kids do for PE? You could design fitness curriculum that includes exercises and an introduction to various sports. Or maybe you include some form of physical fitness as part of your planned unit studies. Or more likely, your kids join a local basketball team or take a class at the YMCA. And in doing so, you don’t worry too much about justifying it as fulfilling a PE requirement—it’s pretty obvious isn’t it? Continue reading »

A Course of Study in Good Citizenship: Upper Elementary

Justice concept. Gavel,  golden scales and books in the library with dof effect. 3d

One of the few requirements for homeschooling in Texas is to have a curriculum that provides for a course of study in good citizenship. For high schoolers, this seems relatively clear since most public high school students take a one semester government class. However, there isn’t any such designated class for middle or elementary school. Continue reading »