Tag Archives: Teaching Methods

Self-Directed Learning

read 200The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

The concept of Self-Directed Learning (SDL) is one which educators have investigated and discussed for many years. This Digest will examine the basic tenets of SDL, and it will discuss recently conducted research findings germane to its application in K-12 classrooms. Continue reading »

Science Notebooks: Tools For Increasing Achievement Across the Curriculum

microscope 200With the implementation of high stakes accountability programs, instruction in science has suffered. In some states, science is receiving decreased attention because it is not tested. A 1999 study of elementary school teachers found that 34 percent of instructional time was being devoted to reading, 24 percent to mathematics, and 17 percent to writing, while only 9 percent of total class time was spent on social studies, and only 8 percent on science. Only physical education and health received less time than science at a mere 5 percent and 3 percent respectively (Jones, et al., 1999). This study was conducted in North Carolina where high-stakes testing had been implemented. Continue reading »

Science in the Home School

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

If your child is among the 700,000 to 1,150,000 currently being schooled at home in the United States (Ray, 1996), you may have questions about the science he or she should be learning. Though children schooled at home perform quite well on achievement tests and are often placed at higher grade levels than their peers in school, (Rudner, 1999), decisions have to be made about the specific science skills and content to be learned. Parents who are looking to the future and are emphasizing math, science, and reading proficiency (Rieseberg, 1995) will want to align their home school programs with professional, state, and national standards. Continue reading »

“Remember the Ladies” Women in the Curriculum

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

In March 1776, Abigail Adams implored her husband John to “…remember the ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors….” This plea, unfortunately, did not affect the practical political behavior of John Adams and other founders of the United States. It was not until the 20th Amendment to the Constitution in 1919 that women throughout the United States gained a fundamental right of citizenship: the right to vote for representation in government. Continue reading »

The Lord of the Rings Guide to Homeschooling

canyon 200Since the Lord of the Rings is about a difficult journey undertaken by the least likely characters, I thought it would be a good source of wisdom for homeschoolers. But then as I really started thinking about it, I realized it might not be the best analogy. After all, Frodo destroys the ring but loses a finger in the process and joins the elves fleeing to the havens. That’s just depressing. I guess you could say that the ring represent government authority over education and needs to be destroyed but then who are the elves and what is Aragon king of? So it’s probably better not to look for all encompassing themes and meaning. Continue reading »

Learning to Learn: Preparing Teachers and Students for Problem-Based Learning

The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach that challenges students to “learn to learn”. Students work cooperatively in groups to seek solutions to real-world problems and more importantly, to develop skills to become self-directed learners. Here, the goal of problem-based learning is viewed as learning for capability rather than learning for the sake of acquiring knowledge. Continue reading »

Learning History through Children’s Literature

childrens-books 200The following article is from the Office of Educational Research and Improvement which is part of the Department of Education.

THIS DIGEST WAS CREATED BY ERIC, THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ERIC, CONTACT ACCESS ERIC 1-800-LET-ERIC

Teaching history using children’s literature, both fiction and non-fiction, is an old idea enjoying new vitality in the elementary and middle school curriculum. This Digest discusses (1) the revival of interest in teaching history through children’s literature, (2) research-based guidelines for teachers of history and children’s literature, and (3) an innovative method of teaching history using children’s literature. Continue reading »

Journal Writing in Experiential Education: Possibilities, Problems, and Recommendations

Educators who work in the field of experiential education often encourage or require their students to keep journals. Journals are a time-honored venue for facilitating reflection, an important component of experiential education (Bennion & Olsen, 2002; Priest & Gass, 1997). Despite their popularity, however, surprisingly little is published about the theory and practice of journal writing in experiential education. Continue reading »